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FoSSA: Fundamentals of Statistical Software & Analysis

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  1. Course Information

    Meet the Teaching Team
  2. Course Dataset 1
  3. Course Dataset 2
  4. MODULE A1: INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS USING R, STATA, AND SPSS
    A1.1 What is Statistics?
  5. A1.2.1a Introduction to Stata
  6. A1.2.2b: Introduction to R
  7. A1.2.2c: Introduction to SPSS
  8. A1.3: Descriptive Statistics
  9. A1.4: Estimates and Confidence Intervals
  10. A1.5: Hypothesis Testing
  11. A1.6: Transforming Variables
  12. End of Module A1
    1 Quiz
  13. MODULE A2: POWER & SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATIONS
    A2.1 Key Concepts
  14. A2.2 Power calculations for a difference in means
  15. A2.3 Power Calculations for a difference in proportions
  16. A2.4 Sample Size Calculation for RCTs
  17. A2.5 Sample size calculations for cross-sectional studies (or surveys)
  18. A2.6 Sample size calculations for case-control studies
  19. End of Module A2
    1 Quiz
  20. MODULE B1: LINEAR REGRESSION
    B1.1 Correlation and Scatterplots
  21. B1.2 Differences Between Means (ANOVA 1)
  22. B1.3 Univariable Linear Regression
  23. B1.4 Multivariable Linear Regression
  24. B1.5 Model Selection and F-Tests
  25. B1.6 Regression Diagnostics
  26. End of Module B1
    1 Quiz
  27. MODULE B2: MULTIPLE COMPARISONS & REPEATED MEASURES
    B2.1 ANOVA Revisited - Post-Hoc Testing
  28. B2.2 Correcting For Multiple Comparisons
  29. B2.3 Two-way ANOVA
  30. B2.4 Repeated Measures and the Paired T-Test
  31. B2.5 Repeated Measures ANOVA
  32. End of Module B2
    1 Quiz
  33. MODULE B3: NON-PARAMETRIC MEASURES
    B3.1 The Parametric Assumptions
  34. B3.2 Mann-Whitney U Test
  35. B3.3 Kruskal-Wallis Test
  36. B3.4 Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test
  37. B3.5 Friedman Test
  38. B3.6 Spearman's Rank Order Correlation
  39. End of Module B3
    1 Quiz
  40. MODULE C1: BINARY OUTCOME DATA & LOGISTIC REGRESSION
    C1.1 Introduction to Prevalence, Risk, Odds and Rates
  41. C1.2 The Chi-Square Test and the Test For Trend
  42. C1.3 Univariable Logistic Regression
  43. C1.4 Multivariable Logistic Regression
  44. End of Module C1
    1 Quiz
  45. MODULE C2: SURVIVAL DATA
    C2.1 Introduction to Survival Data
  46. C2.2 Kaplan-Meier Survival Function & the Log Rank Test
  47. C2.3 Cox Proportional Hazards Regression
  48. C2.4 Poisson Regression
  49. End of Module C2
    1 Quiz

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this section, students will be able to:

  • Open datasets in their chosen statistical software programme
  • Explore datasets and understand what data they have
  • Use basic commands to edit their data

IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (or SPSS) is a user friendly software package for conducting statistical analysis. This does not mean that this software is only useful for social science data, the name is just a nod to its origins and the team of social scientists who developed SPSS v1 back in 1968.Β  We are currently on SPSS v29 and the modern version of SPSS allows us to perform a wide array of statistical tests and it can handle the majority of situations, as you will see throughout this course. SPSS has a very intuitive user interface, it allows you to easily visualise your data, and it is very useful for students who have not had much experience of statistical analysis OR coding before, so you are not having to learn a programming language at the same time as learning how to do statistics. If you are planning to analyse large epidemiological datasets, or so a lot of complex statistical modelling, there are some functions you may need which SPSS cannot perform, or cannot do as well as one of the other software packages on this course. If this is your aim, you might be better learning to use Stata or R.

Once you have your software installed watch the below video and work your way through the practical exercise to set up and investigate your course datasets.

The instructions for this course assume you are using SPSS v29. If you are using an earlier version some of the instructions may not match exactly, but changes of core functions between versions are minimal and you should be able to follow along.

A1.2.3 PRACTICAL: SPSS

Use the steps described in the video to open the FoSSA Whitehall data set in SPSS.

Visit the ‘Variables’ tab and classify each of the variables as ‘nominal’, ‘ordinal’ or ‘scale’ depending on the variable type. Refer back to the information on the course data within the course information section if you are unsure.

Categorical variables can be treated by SPSS as either nominal, where categories have no order (e.g. Yes/No) or ordinal, where categories can put put in a logical order from smallest to largest (e.g. age groups). Scale in SPSS means any continuous variable.

Then add your value labels for all categorical variables. This is where you input each value that is used to represent a category and assign that category a name. You can copy and paste value label sets from one variable to another. So if, as with this dataset, there are lots of Yes/No categorical variables, you can define that 0 = No and 1 = Yes in one variable, and then copy and paste that into all of the others.

Once you have completed all of your value labels, if you go back to the data tab and press the spss button.png button, you will see the labels appear in place of the category codes. You can use this option to toggle back and forth between codes and labels whenever you need to, but the important use of labels is that they appear on your test outputs, so you do not need to keep referring back to your notes to interpret your results.

Once you have set up the FoSSA Whitehall dataset, use the same process to set up the FoSSA Mouse dataset.

Answer

Once you have set up your FoSSA Whitehall dataset, your variables tab should look like this.

Once you have set up the FoSSA Mouse dataset, your variables tab should look like this. Remember, even though BCS variables are considered ordinal, the numbers are not a code for anything else.

πŸ‘‹ Before you go, please rate your satisfaction with this lesson

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Suleyman Abdulahi

impressive course

Alhassane

Very straightforward presentation. Everything was clear. πŸ‘πŸ½πŸ‘πŸΎ

Emmanuel

Although I use R, out of curiosity I clicked on the link to see the Introduction to SPSS, it took me to the login page as observed by Sayed 13 days ago.

Sayed Jalal

When I click on the below link in the last sentence
You can download a copy of the slides here: A1.2.3 Introduction to SPSS

It is not going direct to document. It goes to the: https://login.canvas.ox.ac.uk/
Could you please solve the problem

Hubert

Thank you for letting us know. This has now been fixed.

Sayed Jalal

Thank you. There is no slides. Only one slide with Introduction to SPSS but no more information. Could you please put the complete presentation

Hubert

I am sorry we actually do not have the slides for the video. We have now removed the link to the file.

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